ORIGIN OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM AND ITS ELEMENTS

O. K. MANUEL, J. T. LEE, D. E. RAGLAND, J. M. D. MACELROY*, BIN LI** AND W. K. BROWN***
Nuclear Chemistry, University of Missouri, Rolla, MO 65401 (USA)
Correspondence author's e-mail address: om@umr.edu
(Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry, in press)

Formation of the Solar System from heterogeneous debris of a supernova (SN) that exploded 5 billion years ago was recorded as a) inter-linked chemical and isotopic heterogeneities in meteorites, b) higher levels of extinct nuclides in grains that trapped larger isotopic anomalies, c) the physical properties of grains mentioned in part b, and d) patterns of isotopic anomalies in meteorites, in the solar-wind, and in solar flare particles. The Sun formed on the SN core, and planets formed in a rotationally-supported, equatorial disk of SN debris. Interiors of the Sun and the inner planets accreted first in a central, Fe-rich region surrounding the SN core. These were layered as condensate from other parts of the SN fell toward the condensing Sun. Elements in outer SN layers formed low-density, giant Jovian planets. Intra-solar diffusion enriches hydrogen and lighter isotopes of individual elements at the Sun's surface.

*Chemical Engineering, Univ. College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)
**Lunar & Planetary Lab, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (USA)
*** 5179 Eastshore Drive, Lake Almanor, CA 96137 (USA)